The COVID-19 outbreak is continuing to change everyday life for millions of Americans. Leaders across the county, including the Tri-State area, are providing daily updates on confirmed cases, deaths and measures taking to curb the spread of the virus. Here, you can get the latest information on the coronavirus in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana as well as resources to be prepared and keep your family safe.LATEST CASE NUMBERS: Ohio, 1,087,182, 19,441 deaths | Kentucky 449,864 cases, 6,620 deaths | Indiana, 731,810 cases, 13,028 deathsEducational resources: CLICK HERE to access online learning resourcesCORONAVIRUS IN OHIOThe state of Ohio is lifting all COVID-19 health orders, effective June 2.Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine made that announcement Wednesday, saying that in three weeks, the state will remove health orders, except those for nursing homes and assisted living facilities.That includes the end of the state’s mask mandate.“It’s time to end the health orders. It’s been a year. You’ve followed the protocols. You’ve done what we’ve asked. You’ve bravely fought this virus,” the governor said. “And now, our cases are down, and we have a tested and proven weapon in the vaccine that all Ohioans 12 and over can utilize.”DeWine said businesses and schools across the state are permitted to make their own decisions on the best way to keep customers, employees and students safe.Lifting these health orders will not prevent a business from imposing its own requirements.Why wait three weeks? Waiting will give anyone not vaccinated time to get the one-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine or the first dose of Pfizer/Moderna and be well on the way to immunity, the governor said.”Now, lifting these orders does not mean the virus is gone. It does not mean we are all safe. Each Ohio citizen will make their own decisions about wearing a mask and social distancing — and when, for them, that’s appropriate,” the governor said.DeWine said it now comes down to personal responsibility, adding that each person can choose for themselves whether or not to get protection from COVID-19 via the vaccine.“There comes a time when individual responsibility must take over,” he added.“Those who are not vaccinated remain prey to the virus. We hope for a good summer, but we also have to be able to get through the dark days of winter safely. To do that, we need a much higher percentage of Ohioans to be vaccinated.”The governor cited the sharp drop in the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations and high vaccination rates among people 65 and older. He also said the vaccine is a “tested and proven weapon” that all Ohioans 12 and older can now avail themselves of.In a March 4 primetime address, the governor had previously said he would lift remaining mandates once the state hit 50 coronavirus cases per 100,000 people for two weeks. At the time, the figure was 179 cases per 100,000 people; it had dropped to 123 cases as of this week.Despite DeWine’s message, he also had little choice in removing the mandates. His speech came only a few weeks before fellow GOP lawmakers could have voted to immediately remove all mandates, per a bill passed earlier this year over the governor’s veto. That legislation takes effect June 23. House Republicans signaled their intention to introduce a resolution Wednesday in preparation for a June 23 vote.CORONAVIRUS IN KENTUCKYKentucky’s bar and restaurant curfew will end Memorial Day weekend, Gov. Andy Beshear said Monday.Starting on May 28, bar seating will be allowed again.In March, Beshear extended Kentucky’s bar and restaurant curfew by an hour due to the decrease in the number of COVID-19 cases in the state, stating bars and restaurants can serve until midnight and doors must close by 1 a.m. On May 28, that curfew will no longer be in effect.Last week, the governor announced Kentucky will again loosen capacity restrictions — on both indoor and outdoor businesses.Starting May 28, all indoor and outdoor events under 1,000 people can be held at 75% capacity, Gov. Andy Beshear announced Thursday.Events with more than 1,000 people can operate at 60% capacity, the governor added.Why wait until the end of May? Beshear called May an “incredibly important” month because it’s the last full month before children are released for summer break. He said it’s important for people to continue doing their part to follow measures because children can still become sick from COVID-19 while vaccines are not approved for their use.Another change, which goes into effect immediately, will be allowing small groups that are 100 percent vaccinated to gather indoors without masks. That’s an update to the announcement Beshear made last week about vaccinated groups being able to gather outdoor without masks.Beshear’s changes to the mask mandate come after new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about the safety of being unmasked while fully vaccinated. Fully vaccinated means having either the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine or the double-dose Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.The governor stressed the importance of vaccinations continuing in Kentucky for even more restrictions to drop. He has been sticking to his goal of getting 2.5 million residents vaccinated to lift most all restrictions across the state.Still, Beshear reminded the state that Kentucky will continue easing restrictions ahead of reaching the goal. He reminded people that he has been doing so in recent weeks, turning away recent criticism that the state needs to fully ease all restrictions.The governor brought up recent economic trends that he said show Kentucky is fully open because of record sales tax receipts and a budget surplus.So what’s next for Kentucky before the 2.5 million goal? Beshear said he’s waiting to see what CDC decides next week on whether the two-dose Pfizer vaccine will be approved for use in children 12 to 15.Beshear said once that approval is given, the state can come up with a plan to get those children across the state vaccinated. His belief is that when that happens, the state will be able to fully ease all restrictions.CORONAVIRUS IN INDIANAThe Indiana Department of Health announced Wednesday that 852 additional Hoosiers have been diagnosed with COVID-19.That brings the number of Indiana residents now known to have had the novel coronavirus to 731,810 following corrections to the previous day’s dashboard.To date, 13,028 Hoosiers are confirmed to have died from COVID-19, an increase of 10 from the previous day. Another 417 probable deaths have been reported to date based on clinical diagnoses in patients for whom no positive test is on record. A total of 3,432,248 unique individuals have been tested in Indiana, up from 3,427,454 on Tuesday. A total of 10,076,952 tests, including repeat tests for unique individuals, have been reported to the state Department of Health since Feb. 26, 2020.Hoosiers age 16 and older can receive a COVID-19 vaccine.As of Wednesday, a total of 4,657,343 doses have been administered in Indiana. This includes 2,461,137 first doses and 2,196,206 individuals who are fully vaccinated. The fully vaccinated number represents individuals who have received a second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines and those who received the single Johnson & Johnson vaccine.Symptoms:According to the CDC, the following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure: Fever, cough and shortness of breath.Emergency warning signs include:Difficulty breathing or shortness of breathPersistent pain or pressure in the chestNew confusion or inability to arouseBluish lips or face*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.This chart from Prospect Pediatrics compares COVID-19 symptoms to the cold and flu:Resources: – Ohio coronavirus hotline: 833-427-5634- Kentucky coronavirus hotline: (800) 722-5725- Indiana general questions can be directed to the ISDH Epidemiology Resource Center at 317-233-7125 (317-233-1325 after hours) or e-mail [email protected] for Disease Control and Prevention websiteWhat to do if you think you have it:Officials have urged people to be conscious not to overwhelm the health care system. This graphic will help you decide when it is time to see a physician. Helpful tips and guides: → Here’s what you should do if you already have the coronavirus → Dealing with stress, anxiety during coronavirus outbreak→ These viral social media coronavirus posts are FALSE→ How long should you wash your hands to avoid the coronavirus?→ Guidance for self isolation and home quarantine→ How to clean your car for coronavirus→ A guide to keeping your child safe and reassured as coronavirus spreads→ This map tracks the coronavirus in real time→ How to work from home without losing your sanity

The COVID-19 outbreak is continuing to change everyday life for millions of Americans. Leaders across the county, including the Tri-State area, are providing daily updates on confirmed cases, deaths and measures taking to curb the spread of the virus.

Here, you can get the latest information on the coronavirus in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana as well as resources to be prepared and keep your family safe.

LATEST CASE NUMBERS: Ohio, 1,087,182, 19,441 deaths | Kentucky 449,864 cases, 6,620 deaths | Indiana, 731,810 cases, 13,028 deaths

Educational resources: CLICK HERE to access online learning resources

CORONAVIRUS IN OHIO

The state of Ohio is lifting all COVID-19 health orders, effective June 2.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine made that announcement Wednesday, saying that in three weeks, the state will remove health orders, except those for nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

That includes the end of the state’s mask mandate.

“It’s time to end the health orders. It’s been a year. You’ve followed the protocols. You’ve done what we’ve asked. You’ve bravely fought this virus,” the governor said. “And now, our cases are down, and we have a tested and proven weapon in the vaccine that all Ohioans 12 and over can utilize.”

DeWine said businesses and schools across the state are permitted to make their own decisions on the best way to keep customers, employees and students safe.

Lifting these health orders will not prevent a business from imposing its own requirements.

Why wait three weeks? Waiting will give anyone not vaccinated time to get the one-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine or the first dose of Pfizer/Moderna and be well on the way to immunity, the governor said.

“Now, lifting these orders does not mean the virus is gone. It does not mean we are all safe. Each Ohio citizen will make their own decisions about wearing a mask and social distancing — and when, for them, that’s appropriate,” the governor said.

DeWine said it now comes down to personal responsibility, adding that each person can choose for themselves whether or not to get protection from COVID-19 via the vaccine.

“There comes a time when individual responsibility must take over,” he added.

“Those who are not vaccinated remain prey to the virus. We hope for a good summer, but we also have to be able to get through the dark days of winter safely. To do that, we need a much higher percentage of Ohioans to be vaccinated.”

The governor cited the sharp drop in the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations and high vaccination rates among people 65 and older. He also said the vaccine is a “tested and proven weapon” that all Ohioans 12 and older can now avail themselves of.

In a March 4 primetime address, the governor had previously said he would lift remaining mandates once the state hit 50 coronavirus cases per 100,000 people for two weeks. At the time, the figure was 179 cases per 100,000 people; it had dropped to 123 cases as of this week.

Despite DeWine’s message, he also had little choice in removing the mandates. His speech came only a few weeks before fellow GOP lawmakers could have voted to immediately remove all mandates, per a bill passed earlier this year over the governor’s veto. That legislation takes effect June 23. House Republicans signaled their intention to introduce a resolution Wednesday in preparation for a June 23 vote.

CORONAVIRUS IN KENTUCKY

Kentucky’s bar and restaurant curfew will end Memorial Day weekend, Gov. Andy Beshear said Monday.

Starting on May 28, bar seating will be allowed again.

In March, Beshear extended Kentucky’s bar and restaurant curfew by an hour due to the decrease in the number of COVID-19 cases in the state, stating bars and restaurants can serve until midnight and doors must close by 1 a.m. On May 28, that curfew will no longer be in effect.

Last week, the governor announced Kentucky will again loosen capacity restrictions — on both indoor and outdoor businesses.

Starting May 28, all indoor and outdoor events under 1,000 people can be held at 75% capacity, Gov. Andy Beshear announced Thursday.

Events with more than 1,000 people can operate at 60% capacity, the governor added.

Why wait until the end of May? Beshear called May an “incredibly important” month because it’s the last full month before children are released for summer break. He said it’s important for people to continue doing their part to follow measures because children can still become sick from COVID-19 while vaccines are not approved for their use.

Another change, which goes into effect immediately, will be allowing small groups that are 100 percent vaccinated to gather indoors without masks. That’s an update to the announcement Beshear made last week about vaccinated groups being able to gather outdoor without masks.

Beshear’s changes to the mask mandate come after new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about the safety of being unmasked while fully vaccinated. Fully vaccinated means having either the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine or the double-dose Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

The governor stressed the importance of vaccinations continuing in Kentucky for even more restrictions to drop. He has been sticking to his goal of getting 2.5 million residents vaccinated to lift most all restrictions across the state.

Still, Beshear reminded the state that Kentucky will continue easing restrictions ahead of reaching the goal. He reminded people that he has been doing so in recent weeks, turning away recent criticism that the state needs to fully ease all restrictions.

The governor brought up recent economic trends that he said show Kentucky is fully open because of record sales tax receipts and a budget surplus.

So what’s next for Kentucky before the 2.5 million goal? Beshear said he’s waiting to see what CDC decides next week on whether the two-dose Pfizer vaccine will be approved for use in children 12 to 15.

Beshear said once that approval is given, the state can come up with a plan to get those children across the state vaccinated. His belief is that when that happens, the state will be able to fully ease all restrictions.

CORONAVIRUS IN INDIANA

The Indiana Department of Health announced Wednesday that 852 additional Hoosiers have been diagnosed with COVID-19.

That brings the number of Indiana residents now known to have had the novel coronavirus to 731,810 following corrections to the previous day’s dashboard.

To date, 13,028 Hoosiers are confirmed to have died from COVID-19, an increase of 10 from the previous day. Another 417 probable deaths have been reported to date based on clinical diagnoses in patients for whom no positive test is on record.

A total of 3,432,248 unique individuals have been tested in Indiana, up from 3,427,454 on Tuesday. A total of 10,076,952 tests, including repeat tests for unique individuals, have been reported to the state Department of Health since Feb. 26, 2020.

Hoosiers age 16 and older can receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

As of Wednesday, a total of 4,657,343 doses have been administered in Indiana. This includes 2,461,137 first doses and 2,196,206 individuals who are fully vaccinated. The fully vaccinated number represents individuals who have received a second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines and those who received the single Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Symptoms:

According to the CDC, the following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure: Fever, cough and shortness of breath.

Emergency warning signs include:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

This chart from Prospect Pediatrics compares COVID-19 symptoms to the cold and flu:

Resources:

Ohio coronavirus hotline: 833-427-5634

Kentucky coronavirus hotline: (800) 722-5725

Indiana general questions can be directed to the ISDH Epidemiology Resource Center at 317-233-7125 (317-233-1325 after hours) or e-mail [email protected].

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website

What to do if you think you have it:

Officials have urged people to be conscious not to overwhelm the health care system. This graphic will help you decide when it is time to see a physician.

Helpful tips and guides:

→ Here’s what you should do if you already have the coronavirus

→ Dealing with stress, anxiety during coronavirus outbreak

→ These viral social media coronavirus posts are FALSE

→ How long should you wash your hands to avoid the coronavirus?

Guidance for self isolation and home quarantine

→ How to clean your car for coronavirus

→ A guide to keeping your child safe and reassured as coronavirus spreads

→ This map tracks the coronavirus in real time

→ How to work from home without losing your sanity